Mother’s Day 2010 Facts from the Census Bureau:

Amaze your friends and family members this year’s Mother’s Day:

82.8 million Estimated number of mothers in the United States in 2004.
Source: Survey of Income and Program Participation unpublished tabulations

55 percent Percentage of 15- to 44-year-olds who were mothers in 2006.
Source: Fertility of American Women: 2006 http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/fertility/cps2006.html

80 percent Percentage of women 40 to 44 who had given birth as of 2006. In 1976, 90 percent of women in that age group had given birth.
Source: Fertility of American Women: 2006 http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/fertility/cps2006.html
How Many Children

2.1 The total fertility rate (TFR) or number of births per woman in the U.S. in 2007 (based on current birth rates by age). This marks the second consecutive year in which the rate has been above replacement level.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_12.pdf

2.6 The TFR or number of births in 2006 per woman in Utah (based on current birth rates by age), which led the nation. At the other end of the spectrum is Vermont, with a TFR of 1.7 births per women.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

94 Among the 37.8 million mothers living with children younger than 18 in 2004, the percentage who lived with their biological children only. In addition, 3 percent lived with any stepchildren, 2 percent with any adopted children and less than 1 percent with any foster children.
Source: Living Arrangements of Children: 2004 http://www.census.gov/prod/2008pubs/p70-114.pdf
Moms Who’ve Recently Given Birth

*4.3 million *Number of births registered in the United States in 2007. Of this number, 445,045 were to teens 15 to 19 and 7,349 to mothers 45 to 54.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_12.pdf

25.0 Average age of women in 2006 when they gave birth for the first time, down from 25.2 years in 2005. This marks the first decline since this measure became available in 1968.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

40 Percentage of births that were the mother’s first in 2007. Another 32 percent were the second-born; 17 percent, third; and 11 percent, fourth or more.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_12.pdf

18,674 Number of births in 2006 that were the mother’s eighth or more.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

38,568 Number of births in 2006 that did not occur in hospitals. Of these, 24,970 births occurred at home and 10,781 were in free-standing birthing centers.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr58/nvsr58_11.pdf

32.1 Number of twin births per 1,000 total births in 2006.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

153.3 Number of triplet and higher order multiple births per 100,000 total births in 2006.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

August The month with the highest number of births, with 387,798 taking place that month in 2006.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

Wednesday The most common day of the week to deliver, with an average of 13,482 births taking place on Wednesdays during 2006. This is the first time since at least 1990 that a day other than Tuesday had this distinction.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf

Click here to read more Census Bureau Facts on Mother’s Day

This Week’s News:

Stock Market Drops 1,000 points and then recovers, then drops again

If you haven’t read about Thursday’s stock market 1,000-point crash and recovery you must have been hiding under a rock. Still, the stock market is down significantly for the week, nearly 800 points or so. Greece’s troubles are spreading through Europe and now there’s fear that we may see a worldwide effect from their inability to pay down their debt. The violence that escalated (several Greeks died in the clash) are a warning to the US, which has far more debt than Greece’s announced debts (I think they owe more than $140 billion, but we’ll see) and the austerity measures that will have to come into play to make these pay off.

This is worth watching, folks.

Freddie Mac Needs Another .6 billion from the Treasury to get it through another quarter. So far, Freddie Mac has asked for 0 billion – notably, it’s just about what the IMF and Germany are paying to bail out Greece.

Let’s just think about that for a moment. Greece and Freddie Mac are in the hold for about the same amount. Hmmmmm.

IRS and State Revenue Departments Say Numbers Are Way Down for Revenue Collection.

This story caught my eye as well. Want to know how bad 2009 was? Apparently, the IRS has received about 19 percent less in tax revenue than the year before. States across the country are also receiving less in tax revenue – a lot less. What will be the result? State layoffs. Watch for thousands of teachers, firefighters, police, etc. to get laid off this summer, or not rehired for the fall. It’s going to be very tough for them, consumer confidence is going to go down. States, unlike the Federal Government, have to balance their budgets each year. Take 20 percent off the top of a budget and it’s unclear to me how everything is going to balance out.

Foreclosure or Short Sale? Get Ready for the IRS to Issue You a Tax Bill

The 2007 Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act exempts taxpayers from paying tax on up to $2 million in forgiven debt. To qualify, the debt has to be acquired before January 1, 2009 and, it had to have been used solely to buy, build, or remodel/repair a primary residence.

Guess what? A lot of people who did cash-out refinances and used the cash to pay for everything from new cars to college tuition to flat-screen TVs and then went into foreclosure may owe taxes to the IRS.

Here’s a link to the IRS discussion of the 2007 Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act.

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